Eye of the Mariner by Dylan Toh & Marianne Lim




Eye of the Mariner by Dylan Toh & Marianne Lim



Mariner’s Falls Otway Ranges “He prayeth best, who loveth best All things both great and small; For the dear God who loveth us, He made and loveth all.” (From one of few poems I know by Coleridge : Rime of the ancient mariner) I was playing around with reflections and masking for this one. The path is officially closed due to fallen trees and the associated risk. Though they obscure the falls, I thought it would make for an interesting concept /composition to shoot through the trees. (Original image is the right half). The story of this falls is again another microcosm of our recent family trip. We had decided to make an outing to this spot before lunch at Apollo Bay (45 minutes from our accommodation) but as we approached, the signs said ‘closed’. Not knowing what that meant, we visited Carisbrook Falls instead before having lunch with the kids. Having been underwhelmed by Carisbrook , I figured (to Marianne’s chagrin) that we might as well visit something nicer and I doubted that they would have ‘boarded up’ the area to the falls. True enough, there was an advisory sign that there was risk of falling trees. Due to building family angst, I decided to sprint to the falls and back allowing myself half an hour return for the walk and pics. Snap snap snap , sweat sweat sweat and back to potentially triple tantrums! Lucky all was forgiven :) I know we like to present that our family trips are this family nirvana of everyone being happy but the truth is, its sometimes pretty hard to do what you want without upsetting others (oh except Charlotte, she was just crazy on 4 year old adrenaline all trip) and in retrospect, probably should have either visited this spot initially or not at all. But its such a sweet spot though!!! More news – Marianne has been hard working behind the scenes on our website including the following recent additions: [Focus 11 ebook] [Skype post processing]


Dylan Toh & Marianne Lim: Photos

Absolute Magnitude by Timothy Poulton




Absolute Magnitude by Timothy Poulton



Today’s world is a need-it-right-now world. Emails, text messages, and smartphones have made us much more accessible and our level of accountability much higher. The expectations for immediate attention are overwhelming and can negatively impact our creativity and patience; learning to master this difficult skill can increase creativity as well as reduce stress and anxiety. Exercising patience can also improve productivity because it creates a better, clearer state of mind, for wiser decision making. Patience is becoming a lost art. We sometimes feel others becoming more impatient with us if we are not quick to answer or respond right away, combining immediacy and impatience to create an even bigger monster. However, most things worth having, take time to obtain – they take patience. Art cannot be rushed and patience cannot be lost if the picture is to be finished. After a treacherous hike along the Hooker Valley to the base of Mt Cook we had to endure icy pathways, suspension bridges with snow as high as the railing with 100 metre falls to our death, -15 temperatures and snow loaded mountains causing avalanches at every turn. Once arriving at our destination and with conditions so incredible, we knew we had come away with amazing shots. As the sun set and the temperature plummets, that same path awaits in treacherous darkness. The desire to get moving is so overwhelming, a safety-based decision diced with going, or staying longer to wait for the ultimate conditions. Confident in my abilities in the darkness, I waited just that little bit longer, not through bravery, just a desire to come away with something epic. For a closer look and download: HD Follow me on Instagram


Timothy Poulton: Photos